Diabetes Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

How to Take Care of Your Type 2 Diabetes

Testing Your Blood Sugar Levels, and Then Checking Them Again

Another crucial part of taking the best care of yourself is to monitor your blood sugar levels periodically throughout the day. The exact recommended frequency will vary from person to person, so check with your healthcare provider on how often and when you need to do this. It's not only important to check these levels, but it is also a good idea to keep a record of them. This isn't only beneficial for you -- it is also an important tool for your healthcare provider to monitor your levels and make any needed adjustments.
 
Keeping your blood sugar levels as close as you can to your target level will help prevent the complications that can result from type 2 diabetes, such as heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and kidney or eye problems. By recording your blood sugar levels, you will be able to see how food, exercise, medication, illness, and even stress may affect your blood sugar. It also helps you to monitor whether you are having problems with high or low levels at certain times during the day, signaling that you may need to adjust your medicine or lifestyle habits.
 
Your healthcare provider or diabetes educator can help you set up the best schedule for testing your blood sugar level. He or she will also help you to determine your blood sugar goals, which will be personalized for your particular situation. For some people with type 2 diabetes, they may need to only check their blood sugar levels once or twice a day. Others may need to check it more often. In those who have adequately controlled blood sugar levels, they may need to only check it a few times a week.
 
Your healthcare provider may also order an A1c test a few times a year. This blood test helps to determine how well your blood sugar levels are controlled. It is used to measure long-term control, as it basically helps to give an average of your blood sugar levels over a period of about three months (see A1c Basics for People With Type 2 Diabetes).
 
7 Signs of High Blood Sugar

Information on Type 2 Diabetes

Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.