Diabetes Articles A-Z

Metformin Overdose - Novolin R Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Metformin Overdose to Novolin R Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Metformin Overdose
    It is possible to overdose on metformin. This portion of the eMedTV Web site describes some effects of a metformin overdose, including low blood sugar or lactic acidosis. This page explains symptoms of a metformin overdose and some treatment options.
  • Metformin Problems
    Metformin may cause a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains what other metformin problems may occur with treatment, including potential side effects of the drug.
  • Metformin Risks
    Vomiting, diarrhea, and weakness are some of the most common side effects reported with metformin. This eMedTV resource explores other possible metformin risks, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Metformin Side Affects
    Common metformin side effects include diarrhea, indigestion, and vomiting. This eMedTV article also lists potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention. Metformin side affects is a common misspelling of metformin side effects.
  • Metformin Side Effects
    Some of the most common metformin side effects can include indigestion, headache, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious metformin side effects, such as chest pain or signs of lactic acidosis.
  • Metformin Strengths
    There are five strengths available for the tablet version of metformin. This eMedTV resource provides metformin dosing guidelines for both adults and children between the ages of 10 and 16. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • Metformin Strengths -- 500 Mg, 625 Mg, 750 Mg, 850 Mg, 1000 Mg
    There are many available metformin strengths, including 500 mg, 850 mg, and 1000 mg. This eMedTV page explains what strengths are available for long-acting metformin and offers dosing guidelines for both adults and children.
  • Metformin Uses
    Metformin is prescribed to help lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes how metformin works to decrease the absorption of sugar in the blood and outlines several off-label metformin uses.
  • Metformin Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at a number of metformin warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions and the safety of taking the drug while breastfeeding. This page also explains who should avoid the drug.
  • Metformine
    Metformin is a medicine that is available by prescription to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes the various metformin products available and lists possible side effects of the drug. Metformine is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metfromin
    Metformin is a medication approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains how metformin works and lists some of its potential side effects. Metfromin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metglip
    Metaglip may be prescribed to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This page of the eMedTV Web site briefly explains how the drug works and lists a few possible side effects. Metglip is a common misspelling of Metaglip.
  • Metiformin
    Metformin is a prescription medicine licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page describes the effects of metformin and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using this drug. Metiformin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metphormin
    Metformin works to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how metformin works and covers what to tell your healthcare provider prior to taking the drug. Metphormin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Micronase
    Micronase is a prescription drug that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works to increase insulin production, outlines potential side effects, and offers tips on taking it.
  • Micronase for Diabetes
    As this eMedTV page explains, type 2 diabetes can often be managed with Micronase. This segment provides a brief overview of this drug, with a look at how it works and when it should be taken. There is also a link to an in-depth article on this topic.
  • Micronized Glyburide
    Micronized glyburide is used to help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug increases insulin production, describes how it differs from the unmicronized version, and offers tips on taking it.
  • Milk Thissel
    People may use milk thistle medicinally to treat a number of health conditions. This eMedTV page describes the possible benefits of milk thistle and provides a link to more information. Milk thissel is a common misspelling of milk thistle.
  • Milk Thistel
    Milk thistle may help to treat a variety of health conditions, such as diabetes, heartburn, and indigestion. This eMedTV segment discusses what you need to know before using milk thistle medicinally. Milk thistel is a common misspelling of milk thistle.
  • Milk Thistle
    Milk thistle is an herbal product claimed to treat several health conditions, such as diabetes. This eMedTV article provides an overview of milk thistle, including information on its effectiveness, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Milk Thistle and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe to use milk thistle while breastfeeding. This page of the eMedTV library covers the problems that could occur when taking milk thistle and breastfeeding at the same time (such as a negative effect on quantity and quality of the milk).
  • Milk Thistle and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use milk thistle during pregnancy, as the herb may have estrogen-like effects. This eMedTV page offers more information on milk thistle and pregnancy, and stresses the importance of talking to your doctor about the risks involved.
  • Milk Thistle Benefits
    Milk thistle may help to treat several conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol, and liver disease. This eMedTV resource explores other milk thistle benefits, and explains how more research is needed to determine the effectiveness of this plant.
  • Milk Thistle Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, there is no standard milk thistle dosage established at this time. This page describes the doses of milk thistle that were used in some studies of the supplement, and offers tips on when and how to take this herb.
  • Milk Thistle Drug Interactions
    There is little information available about which medications may interact with milk thistle. However, as this eMedTV page explains, it is theoretically possible that there are several milk thistle drug interactions that are just not known at this time.
  • Milk Thistle Overdose
    An overdose on milk thistle could cause diarrhea or bloating. This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains what to expect if you take too much of this herbal supplement and describes possible treatment options for a milk thistle overdose.
  • More About Milk Thistle Side Effects
    Headaches, nausea, and diarrhea are among the possible side effects of milk thistle. This part of the eMedTV archives describes other milk thistle side effects to watch out for, including serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Milk Thistle Supplement Information
    This page of the eMedTV Web site provides some basic information on milk thistle supplements. It takes a look at some of the uses for this product, how it works, and safety precautions to be aware of before beginning treatment.
  • Milkthistle
    Milk thistle may have several beneficial uses, such as treating or preventing liver disease. This eMedTV resource features a brief look at milk thistle and offers a link to more detailed information. Milkthistle is a common misspelling of milk thistle.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After EGD With Dilation
    This video explains what to expect in the recovery room after an EGD.
  • Muscle Atrophy and Weakness
    When diabetic neuropathy affects the extremities -- the arms and legs -- it is called peripheral neuropathy. Along with numbness and tingling, people may experience muscle weakness and even loss of muscle. For some reason, the ankle is often affected, which leads to changes in gait. Foot deformities may also occur, resulting in hammertoe or fallen arches; blisters and sores on the foot may go unnoticed and may evolve into serious problems.
  • Nasina
    Nesina is a prescription drug approved to treat type 2 diabetes. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes how Nesina lowers blood sugar levels and explains how often the drug should be taken. Nasina is a common misspelling of Nesina.
  • Natural Remedies for Diabetes
    There is limited scientific evidence on the effectiveness of natural remedies for diabetes. This eMedTV article describes these natural remedies for diabetes in detail, such as magnesium, garlic, and chromium, and describes other natural remedies.
  • Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus
    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus occurs when the kidneys are unable to respond to antidiuretic hormone (ADH). This eMedTV resource explains in detail how this condition affects the balance of fluids in your body.
  • Nesina
    Nesina is a prescription medicine used to decrease blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works, lists potential side effects, describes dosing guidelines, and covers various other topics.
  • Nesina Alternatives
    There are many alternatives to Nesina (alogliptin), such as lifestyle changes or other diabetes medications. This eMedTV article examines these alternatives and describes how some of the other medications work to treat type 2 diabetes.
  • Nesina and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is recommended that Nesina (alogliptin) be used with caution while breastfeeding. This article tells you what you need to know about Nesina and nursing. It also covers the manufacturer's recommendations.
  • Nesina and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource explores pregnancy and Nesina (alogliptin), explaining how the FDA categorizes the drug as a pregnancy Category B medication. It is generally considered safe to take this drug while pregnant, but you should first talk to your doctor.
  • Nesina Approval
    This eMedTV selection explores Nesina, a diabetes medicine that received approval by the FDA in January 2013. More information on Nesina is covered in this article, including how it works, dosing tips, and potential side effects.
  • Nesina Dosage
    This eMedTV segment explains that the recommended dosage of Nesina for treating type 2 diabetes is 25 mg taken once a day. This article discusses when a healthcare provider may prescribe a lower dose and lists some tips for taking these tablets.
  • Nesina Drug Interactions
    This portion of the eMedTV Web library explores potential interactions between Nesina and other medications, such as insulin and insulin secretagogues. This resource also explains how these interactions can lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels.
  • Nesina Medication Information
    The diabetes drug Nesina is used for controlling blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource gives a brief overview of Nesina, with information on how it works and what side effects may occur with the use of this medication.
  • Nesina Overdose
    It is possible to overdose on Nesina (alogliptin). However, as this eMedTV Web resource explains, there have not been any reported cases of an overdose on this drug. This page also explains how overdose symptoms might be treated.
  • Nesina Side Effects
    Some of the most common Nesina side effects can include a runny or stuffy nose and common cold symptoms. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some of the more serious Nesina side effects, such as signs of pancreatitis or liver problems.
  • Nesina Uses
    Nesina is prescribed to help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This part of the eMedTV Web library describes how Nesina works and discusses whether the medication is safe for use in children and older adults.
  • Nesina Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at a number of Nesina warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions, allergic reactions, and other complications. This page also explains who should avoid taking this medication.
  • Nisina
    Nesina is a diabetes medication used for lowering blood sugar levels in adults. This eMedTV segment explains how Nesina works and lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting the drug. Nisina is a common misspelling of Nesina.
  • Novalog
    NovoLog is a prescription drug used for controlling blood sugar in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article describes the effects of NovoLog and explains what forms this drug comes in. Novalog is a common misspelling of NovoLog.
  • Novalog Side Effects
    Potential NovoLog side effects include low blood potassium and injection site reactions. This eMedTV segment also lists signs of low blood sugar (a potentially serious side effect). Novalog side effects is a common misspelling of NovoLog side effects.
  • Novolin 70/30
    Novolin 70/30 is an insulin medication approved for the treatment of diabetes in adults. This eMedTV article describes the effects of this medication, explains when and how to inject it, lists potential side effects that may occur, and more.
  • Novolin 70/30 and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding can affect your blood sugar and, consequently, your insulin requirements. This eMedTV segment provides more details on Novolin 70/30 and breastfeeding, including information on whether this product passes through breast milk.
  • Novolin 70/30 and Pregnancy
    Novolin 70/30 is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This part of the eMedTV Web site offers a more in-depth look at Novolin 70/30 and pregnancy, and explains whether insulin products cross the placenta.
  • Novolin 70/30 Dosage
    Your doctor will recommend your Novolin 70/30 dosage based on your blood sugar levels and other factors. This eMedTV page lists other factors that may help determine Novolin 70/30 dosing and offers tips and precautions for those using this drug.
  • Novolin 70/30 Drug Interactions
    Fluoxetine, fibrates, and MAOIs are some of the medicines that may cause Novolin 70/30 drug interactions. As this eMedTV resource explains, drug interactions such as these can result in dangerously low blood sugar levels, which can be fatal.
  • Novolin 70/30 Insulin Information
    Are you looking for information about Novolin 70/30 insulin? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this product, with information on what it is used for, how to take it, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Novolin 70/30 Overdose
    A Novolin 70/30 overdose can result in low blood sugar levels. This article from the eMedTV archives lists symptoms of low blood sugar, explains how an overdose may occur, and describes various treatment options for a Novolin 70/30 overdose.
  • Novolin 70/30 Side Effects
    Potential Novolin 70/30 side effects include skin reactions at the injection site and low blood sugar. This eMedTV page also lists serious side effects that require medical attention, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dangerously low blood sugar.
  • Novolin 70/30 Uses
    Novolin 70/30 is used for controlling blood sugar levels in adults with diabetes. This page from the eMedTV library discusses these uses in more detail, including information on possible off-label uses and an explanation of how Novolin 70/30 works.
  • Novolin 70/30 Warnings and Precautions
    Low blood sugar is the most common (and usually most serious) side effect of Novolin 70/30. This eMedTV segment contains other Novolin 70/30 warnings and precautions, including information on who should not use this insulin medication.
  • Novolin R
    Novolin R is a short-acting, non-prescription insulin approved for controlling blood sugar after meals. This eMedTV resource features an overview of Novolin R, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and general precautions.
  • Novolin R and Breastfeeding
    Novolin R (regular insulin) is generally considered safe for use in breastfeeding women. This eMedTV page covers Novolin R and breastfeeding in more detail and explains why this insulin is unlikely to be dangerous even if it passes through breast milk.
  • Novolin R and Pregnancy
    Novolin R (regular insulin) is generally considered safe for treating diabetes in pregnant women. This eMedTV segment includes more information on Novolin R and pregnancy, and explores the risk of high or low blood sugar levels in pregnant women.
  • Novolin R Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, your Novolin R dosage will be based on several factors, such as how you respond to the insulin and the carbohydrate content of your meals. This page offers other Novolin R dosing tips, including how to take this insulin.
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