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Lipid Effects of Avandia - Metformin Oral Solution Info

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Lipid Effects of Avandia to Metformin Oral Solution Info. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Lipid Effects of Avandia
    This eMedTV page explores the effects of Avandia on lipid levels, explaining that the drug has been shown to increase good and bad cholesterol by about the same amount. This page also discusses the effects of Avandia on free fatty acids and triglycerides.
  • Lipid Lowering With Actos
    In addition to treating type 2 diabetes, Actos has lipid lowering effects. This eMedTV article discusses these effects in detail and describes the changes seen in cholesterol and triglyceride levels when a person is taking the diabetes medication.
  • List of Diabetic Medication
    Diabetic medication includes oral diabetes medications, insulin, and other injectable medications. This eMedTV Web page contains a list of diabetic medication broken down by category and class of medicine, including brand-name drugs.
  • Living With Diabetes
    Proper self-care is an important part of living with diabetes. This page from the eMedTV Web site offers a brief description of managing diabetes and includes a link to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Losartan
    Losartan is a drug that is prescribed for high blood pressure control and diabetic nephropathy treatment. This eMedTV article describes these uses in more detail and offers information on the drug's effects, dosing, and potential side effects.
  • Losartan Dosing
    For high blood pressure control, losartan dosing usually starts at 50 mg once daily. This part of the eMedTV library also offers dosing recommendations for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy and provides tips for taking the medication.
  • Losartan Potassium
    This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a brief look at losartan potassium. It lists the conditions this drug can treat, explains how it works, and offers some helpful dosing tips. There is also a link to a more detailed article on this topic.
  • Losartan Pottassium
    Losartan is a prescription drug used for treating high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this drug and its uses. Losartan pottassium is a common misspelling of losartan potassium.
  • Losartan Side Effects
    This eMedTV Web page lists common losartan side effects, such as infection, back pain, and dizziness. This selection from the archives also features information on rare side effects and problems that require prompt medical attention.
  • Losarten
    This eMedTV Web resource explains how losartan works to treat several conditions involving the heart and blood vessels. This Web page also describes the factors that may affect your losartan dosage. Losarten is a common misspelling of losartan.
  • Losartin
    Losartan is a medicine that is licensed to treat high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV page further discusses these uses and offers a link to more detailed information about the drug. Losartin is a common misspelling of losartan.
  • Losartin Side Effects
    Common losartan side effects may include dizziness, diarrhea, and fatigue. This eMedTV page lists other possible side effects, including problems that require medical attention. Losartin side effects is a common misspelling of losartan side effects.
  • Losarton
    A doctor may prescribe losartan for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy and high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains how losartan works and also covers some general precautions with the drug. Losarton is a common misspelling of losartan.
  • Managing Diabetes
    Eating healthy foods, being active, and monitoring blood glucose levels are aspects of managing diabetes. This eMedTV resource provides additional tips for managing this condition and reducing your risk for things like stroke and kidney failure.
  • Mealtime Insulin and Snacks
    Do I need to take my insulin after a snack, or just at mealtimes? This eMedTV segment tells you what you need to know about snacking when you have type 2 diabetes, with info on timing your insulin properly, choosing the right foods, and more.
  • Mealtime Insulin Concerns
    Privacy, convenience, and low blood sugar are the three main concerns that people have about mealtime insulin. Learn about mealtime insulin concerns in this video from eMedTV.com.
  • Mealtime Insulin Timing
    Learn about how to time your mealtime insulin injections in this video clip from eMedTV.com.
  • Medformin
    Metformin is a diabetes medication that is available by prescription only. This eMedTV page explains how metformin works to lower blood sugar and lists some of the potential side effects of this drug. Medformin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Mentanx
    As this eMedTV resource explains, Metanx is a combination vitamin prescribed to improve blood flow in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hyperhomocysteinemia. This page also covers dosing. Mentanx is a common misspelling of Metanx.
  • Mentax
    As this eMedTV page explains, Metanx is a vitamin prescribed to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hyperhomocysteinemia. This article takes a brief look at how Metanx works and possible side effects. Mentax is a common misspelling of Metanx.
  • Metaforen
    Metformin is a diabetes medication used for lowering blood sugar levels. This eMedTV segment explains how metformin works and lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting the drug. Metaforen is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metaforim
    Metformin is a prescription drug approved to treat type 2 diabetes. This page on the eMedTV site describes how metformin lowers blood sugar levels and explains how often the drug should be taken. Metaforim is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metaformin
    Metformin is a drug often prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article describes the effects of metformin, explains how it works, and lists some of its potential side effects. Metaformin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metaglip
    Metaglip is a prescription medicine that is used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works to lower blood sugar, lists potential side effects, and offers tips on taking the medication.
  • Metaglip Alternatives
    This segment of the eMedTV archives takes an in-depth look at some of the Metaglip alternatives available, such as lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications. This page also explains when it may be necessary to use an alternative to Metaglip.
  • Metaglip and Blood Sugar
    This eMedTV page lists symptoms of high and low blood sugar levels, which are possible effects of Metaglip. Blood sugar levels that are too high or too low can cause serious or even life-threatening complications, which this page also explains.
  • Metaglip and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment explores some of the complications associated with Metaglip and pregnancy based on the results of animal studies. An explanation of how the FDA categorizes the safety of drugs during pregnancy is also provided.
  • Metaglip Dosage
    The recommended starting Metaglip dose is 2.5 mg/250 mg, taken once daily with a meal. This eMedTV segment offers some tips on when and how to take the drug and also lists the factors that will determine your exact Metaglip dosage.
  • Metaglip Drug Info
    If you are looking for information on Metaglip, this eMedTV article is a good place to start. This Web page features an overview of this diabetes drug, including how it works and why it's important to discuss certain issues with your healthcare provider.
  • Metaglip Drug Interactions
    This page of the eMedTV archives explores potential Metaglip drug interactions with other medications, such as NSAIDs, diuretics, and estrogens. This page also discusses how these interactions can lead to problems with blood sugar and other things.
  • Metaglip Overdose
    This eMedTV Web page outlines some of the possible symptoms of a Metaglip overdose, such as loss of consciousness, trouble breathing, and an irregular heartbeat. Treatment options are also described, such as IV fluids and supportive care.
  • Metaglip Side Affects
    This eMedTV resource lists possible side effects of Metaglip, such as diarrhea, low blood sugar, or an upper respiratory infection. A link to more information is also provided. Metaglip side affects is a common misspelling of Metaglip side effects.
  • Metaglip Uses
    This eMedTV resource explores Metaglip uses in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The effects of the drug on the liver and pancreas are described in depth. This resource also explains why Metaglip is not used in children or to treat type 1 diabetes.
  • Metaglip Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article examines several Metaglip warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions, possible allergic reactions, and the danger of taking the medication while pregnant. This page also describes who should not take Metaglip.
  • Metanax
    Metanx is a vitamin prescribed to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathy and hyperhomocysteinemia. This eMedTV page lists medical conditions you must tell your doctor about before using this supplement. Metanax is a common misspelling of Metanx.
  • Metanex
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Metanx is a vitamin prescribed to improve blood flow in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy or hyperhomocysteinemia. This page lists dosing guidelines and safety precautions. Metanex is a common misspelling of Metanx.
  • Metanx
    Metanx is a vitamin prescribed to increase circulation in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This eMedTV page further describes this supplement, with details on how it works to improve blood flow, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Metanx 3-35-2 Mg Tablets
    This eMedTV resource explains that there is only one form and strength of Metanx available. This page takes a brief look at Metanx 3-35-2 mg tablets, including information on what vitamins are in each tablet and the factors that may affect your dose.
  • Metanx and Breastfeeding
    You may not be able to safely take Metanx while breastfeeding. This page from the eMedTV Web archives explains that it is not known whether this prescription supplement passes through breast milk or if it would cause problems in a nursing infant.
  • Metanx and Diabetes
    Available by prescription only, Metanx is a vitamin used to help improve blood flow in people with diabetes. This eMedTV segment gives more information on how using Metanx for certain diabetes complications can help improve how damaged nerves function.
  • Metanx and Pregnancy
    If you are taking Metanx and become pregnant, let your doctor know. This eMedTV article explains why it may not be safe to use Metanx during pregnancy. This page also discusses why this prescription vitamin does not have a pregnancy Category rating.
  • Metanx Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the recommended dosing guidelines for Metanx call for one tablet to be taken twice a day. This article discusses some of the factors that may affect your dosage and explains when and how to take this vitamin.
  • Metanx Drug Interactions
    Some antibiotics and anti-seizure medicines can negatively react with Metanx. This eMedTV Web selection highlights other negative Metanx drug interactions and describes some of the potentially serious complications these reactions can cause.
  • Metanx Ingredients
    There is only one form and strength of Metanx available. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at the ingredients in Metanx, which include a form of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12. This page also offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Metanx Medical Food
    Because it is considered a medical food, Metanx is not approved by the FDA. This page from the eMedTV Web library further discusses what medical foods are and how they are different from prescription medicines. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Metanx Medication Information
    Metanx is a vitamin prescribed to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathy or hyperhomocysteinemia. This eMedTV article offers important medication information on Metanx, including how to take this vitamin, possible side effects, and general safety issues.
  • Metanx Overdose
    Mental changes, numbness in the feet or hands, and headaches are possible signs of a Metanx overdose. This eMedTV page lists other symptoms a person might experience after taking too much of this vitamin, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • Metanx Side Affects
    While most people do not have problems with Metanx, side effects are possible. This eMedTV page describes some of these possible side effects, including potentially serious problems. Metanx side affects is a common misspelling of Metanx side effects.
  • Metanx Side Effects
    Nausea, headaches, and drowsiness are among the possible side effects of Metanx. As this eMedTV page explains, there are also more serious problems that may occur, such as difficulty breathing. This page also discusses when to seek medical attention.
  • Metanx Uses
    Metanx is prescribed for treating certain problems associated with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This eMedTV page discusses how this vitamin works to improve blood flow and nerve function. Possible off-label uses for Metanx are also listed.
  • Metanx Vitamin
    People with certain complications from diabetes may benefit from the prescription vitamin Metanx. This eMedTV article explains how the active forms of folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 in Metanx may help improve blood flow and treat damaged nerves.
  • Metanx Warnings and Precautions
    People with a seizure disorder may not be able to take Metanx, as it may increase the risk for seizures. This eMedTV page lists precautions to be aware of before taking Metanx, including warnings of possible drug interactions and other complications.
  • Metax
    Metanx is a prescription vitamin used to treat diabetic peripheral neuropathy or hyperhomocysteinemia. This eMedTV segment explains how Metanx works and describes who may not be able to take this supplement. Metax is a common misspelling of Metanx.
  • Metforim
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor may prescribe metformin to help lower your blood sugar levels. This eMedTV segment explains how metformin works and further describes the effects of this drug. Metforim is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metforin
    People with type 2 diabetes may need to take a drug like metformin to lower their blood sugar levels. This eMedTV page lists various metformin products and explains how the drug works for diabetes. Metforin is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metform
    A doctor may prescribe metformin to help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article lists the various forms that metformin comes in and explains how the medication works. Metform is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metforman
    This eMedTV page covers how metformin works to control blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of sugar in your blood. This page also explains various forms of the drug and lists overdose symptoms. Metforman is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metformen
    Metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how metformin works and outlines some alternatives to the medication. Metformen is a common misspelling of metformin.
  • Metformin
    Metformin is a prescription medicine used to decrease blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how metformin works to decrease the amount of sugar produced by the body and outlines potential side effects.
  • Metformin 1000 Mg Tablets
    There are three long-acting forms of metformin tablets (1000 mg, 750 mg, and 500 mg). This eMedTV resource lists the various strengths available for regular metformin and offers general dosing guidelines for this medication.
  • Metformin 500 Mg Tablets
    There are many strengths available for metformin tablets (such as 500 mg, 800 mg, and others). This eMedTV Web page offers dosing guidelines for metformin, including detailed information on the different forms and strengths of the medication.
  • Metformin 625 Mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, 625-mg metformin tablets are no longer available. Fortunately, this drug also comes in several other strengths, ranging from metformin 500-mg tablets to metformin 1000-mg tablets.
  • Metformin 750 Mg Tablets
    There are two strengths available for the long-acting form of metformin: 750 mg tablets and 500 mg tablets. This eMedTV segment also explains what strengths are available for regular metformin and offers dosing guidelines for both products.
  • Metformin 850 mg Tablets
    People ages 17 and over may take either metformin 850 mg tablets or metformin 500 mg tablets. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains what other strengths are available for this medicine and also offers metformin dosing guidelines for children.
  • Metformin and Alcohol
    This eMedTV resource explains that while small amounts of alcohol should not be a problem for most people taking metformin, you may be warned to avoid combining metformin and large amounts of alcohol due to an increased risk of lactic acidosis.
  • Metformin and Alcoholic Beverages
    Combining metformin and alcoholic beverages can potentially be dangerous. As this eMedTV page explains, drinking large amounts of alcohol while taking metformin can increase your risk of developing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis.
  • Metformin and Blood Sugar
    This eMedTV segment examines metformin, blood sugar levels, and complications that can occur from high or low blood sugar. This page highlights symptoms of high and low blood sugar levels and explains what to do if these symptoms occur.
  • Metformin and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is recommended that metformin be used with caution while breastfeeding, especially in newborns, premature infants, and those with kidney problems. This article tells you what you need to know about metformin and nursing.
  • Metformin and Children
    Metformin is approved for use in both adults and children who are at least 10 years old. This segment from the eMedTV library provides more information about metformin and children, and describes how the drug works to lower blood sugar levels.
  • Metformin and Contrast Medium
    This eMedTV page explains that there are some situations where you should temporarily stop taking metformin; contrast medium use is one of them. This page explains the risks of taking metformin while undergoing a procedure that uses contrast dye.
  • Metformin and Erectile Dysfunction
    This eMedTV segment explains that while there are potential side effects of metformin, erectile dysfunction does not appear to be one of them. This page explains that metformin may actually help treat erectile dysfunction.
  • Metformin and Hair Loss
    This eMedTV resource explains that hair loss does not appear to be a side effect of metformin. However, you should talk to your healthcare provider about hair loss if you believe the medication may be causing this side effect in you.
  • Metformin and Lactic Acidosis
    This eMedTV resource looks at a life-threatening potential side effect of metformin: lactic acidosis. This page describes some of the symptoms of lactic acidosis and lists some of the factors that can increase your risk of developing this condition.
  • Metformin and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV article explores pregnancy and metformin, explaining how the FDA categorizes the drug as a pregnancy Category B medication. It is generally considered safe to take this drug while pregnant, but you should first talk to your doctor.
  • Metformin and TSH Levels
    This eMedTV article explores metformin, TSH level, and thyroid hormone levels. This page explains that metformin may decrease TSH levels in people with an underactive thyroid or Hashimoto's thyroiditis and may not affect thyroid hormone levels.
  • Metformin and Weight Loss
    Does metformin cause weight loss? As this eMedTV page explains, it's not entirely clear. However, in clinical studies, those taking the drug didn't appear to gain weight. It's also not known if the drug has an effect on weight in non-diabetic people.
  • Metformin Dangers
    Metformin may cause potentially serious side effects such as chest pain and shortness of breath. As this eMedTV resource explains, there are also other possible metformin dangers, including a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis.
  • Metformin Diabetes Medication
    Metformin is a diabetes medication used for controlling blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at metformin and its specific uses, effects, and potential side effects.
  • Metformin Dosing
    This eMedTV segment explains that the recommended starting dosage of metformin is 500 mg twice daily. The maximum dose of the drug will vary depending on several factors, such as age and other medications you are taking.
  • Metformin Drug Interactions
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explores potential metformin drug interactions with other medications, such as thyroid medicines, oral contraceptives, and niacin. This Web page also explains how these interactions can lead to problems.
  • Metformin ER
    Metformin ER is a prescription medication that is licensed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how metformin ER works to control blood sugar levels, its potential side effects, and some tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Metformin HCL
    Metformin HCl is a prescription medicine licensed to treat diabetes. This article on the eMedTV site describes the effects of metformin and explains what different forms this drug comes in. Metformin HCl is an abbreviation for metformin hydrochloride.
  • Metformin HCL 500 mg
    The recommended starting dosage for children ages 10 to 16 is metformin HCL 500 mg twice a day. This eMedTV Web page also includes metformin dosing guidelines for adults and explains what other forms and strengths are available for this medicine.
  • Metformin HCL Side Effects
    Common metformin HCL side effects may include diarrhea, weakness, and abdominal discomfort. As this eMedTV article explains, while most side effects of metformin are mild, some require immediate medical attention (such as blurry vision or chest pain).
  • Metformin Hydrochloride
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, metformin hydrochloride is a medication used for lowering blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This article describes the various forms of metformin currently available and lists some possible side effects.
  • Metformin Medicine for Diabetes
    This eMedTV selection covers metformin, a diabetes medicine that can help decrease blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This article describes how metformin works and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using it.
  • Metformin Oral
    This eMedTV page describes metformin, an oral diabetes medication that is used for decreasing blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This page explains the available forms and strengths of the drug and covers how it works to control blood sugar.
  • Metformin Oral Solution
    Metformin oral solution is used to treat type 2 diabetes in people who have trouble swallowing pills. This eMedTV Web page further explores the drug, including how it works, potential side effects, and dosage information.
  • Metformin Oral Solution Dosage
    This eMedTV article provides various metformin oral solution dosage recommendations for people taking the drug to treat type 2 diabetes. For example, the suggested dose for people ages 10 to 16 is 500 mg (5 mL), taken twice a day.
  • Metformin Oral Solution Info
    As explained in this eMedTV selection, metformin oral solution is a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This article has more information on metformin oral solution, including what to discuss with your doctor before taking it.
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