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Glyburide - Humalog Overdose

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Glyburide to Humalog Overdose. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Glyburide
    Glyburide is a prescription drug that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how it helps increase the production of insulin in the pancreas, outlines potential side effects, and more.
  • Glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase) Medication Information
    This eMedTV article offers basic information on glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), a prescription medication that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article also links to more detailed information on the topic.
  • Glyburide 5 mg
    In many cases, the typical starting dosage of glyburide is 2.5 mg to 5 mg a day. This eMedTV resource describes the available strengths of this diabetes drug and explains the difference between micronized and unmicronized glyburide.
  • Glyburide Alternatives
    This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at some of the glyburide alternatives for type 2 diabetes, such as lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications. This page also explains when an alternative to glyburide might be necessary.
  • Glyburide and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV segment explains, low and high blood sugar levels are possible side effects of glyburide. Blood sugar levels that are too high or too low can cause serious complications, so possible symptoms should be reported to your doctor.
  • Glyburide and Diabetes Control
    As explained in this eMedTV page, clinical studies have shown that glyburide can help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article offers more details on controlling diabetes with glyburide and includes a link to more information.
  • Glyburide and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV resource explores glyburide and pregnancy, explaining that it may not be safe to take the drug when pregnant. This page also explains why the FDA classifies glyburide as both a pregnancy Category B and pregnancy Category C medication.
  • Glyburide Dangers
    You may not be able to use glyburide safely if you have liver problems or certain other medical conditions. This eMedTV selection discusses other potential glyburide dangers to be aware of and covers possible side effects, both common and serious.
  • Glyburide Diabetes Medicine
    As a prescription type 2 diabetes medicine, glyburide helps lower blood sugar. This eMedTV Web resource provides important information on this oral medication, including how it works and side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Glyburide Diabetic Drug Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend a medication called glyburide. This eMedTV page offers more information on this oral diabetic drug, explaining what to discuss with your doctor before taking it.
  • Glyburide Dosing
    In most cases, the recommended starting dose of glyburide is 2.5 mg to 5 mg a day, taken with meals. This eMedTV resource outlines the factors that determine specific glyburide dosing and also offers tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Glyburide Drug Interactions
    This page of the eMedTV library explores potential glyburide drug interactions with other medications, such as thyroid medications, diuretics, and oral contraceptives. This page also explains how these interactions can potentially lead to problems.
  • Glyburide Effectiveness
    As this eMedTV page explains, glyburide is a diabetes drug that has been shown to lower blood sugar. This page takes a look at the effectiveness of glyburide, including details on why it may occasionally need to be combined with other diabetes drugs.
  • Glyburide Medication Information
    Available by prescription only, glyburide is an oral type 2 diabetes drug. This part of the eMedTV site offers more information on glyburide, including the medication's basic dosing guidelines and potential side effects.
  • Glyburide Medicine for Type 2 Diabetes
    Glyburide is a prescription medicine used in people with type 2 diabetes to control blood sugar. This eMedTV article explains why the drug is not used for type 1 diabetes and provides a link to more information on its uses, side effects, and more.
  • Glyburide Oral
    This eMedTV Web page explains that glyburide is an oral medication used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article looks at some of the dosing guidelines for the drug and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Glyburide Overdose
    While uncommon, there are cases of people taking too much glyburide. This eMedTV article describes glyburide overdose symptoms, such as dizziness, difficulty speaking, and blurry vision. This page also lists treatment options for a recent overdose.
  • Glyburide Pills
    Available in the form of a pill, glyburide is a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV selection briefly describes how this drug works and provides a link to more detailed information on ensuring a safe, effective treatment with glyburide.
  • Glyburide Problems
    As this eMedTV article explains, glyburide can cause nausea, heartburn, and other side effects, but it is generally well tolerated. This resource lists other problems that can occur with glyburide and provides links to more detailed information.
  • Glyburide Risks
    As this eMedTV page explains, a person taking glyburide has a higher chance of nausea and other stomach problems than someone not taking it. This article lists some of the other risks associated with glyburide and provides a link to more information.
  • Glyburide Side Effects
    Some of the most common glyburide side effects can include stomach problems or allergic skin reactions. This eMedTV segment also describes some of the more serious and rare side effects of the drug and explains what to do if side effects occur.
  • Glyburide Strengths
    As explained in this eMedTV article, the diabetes drug glyburide comes in a number of strengths, ranging from 1.25 mg to 6 mg. This resource lists all of the currently available strengths and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Glyburide Substitutes
    In certain situations, you may require an alternative to glyburide. This eMedTV Web page explains when a doctor may recommend a glyburide substitute and discusses some of these other medicines and lifestyle changes that can be used for type 1 diabetes.
  • Glyburide to Lower Blood Sugar
    If you have type 2 diabetes, glyburide could help you lower your blood sugar. This eMedTV article takes a quick look at how you can control your blood sugar with this medication and explains how it is taken. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Glyburide Uses
    This eMedTV resource explores various glyburide uses, such as treating people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes (an off-label use). This page also explains how glyburide works to increase insulin production and improve insulin resistance.
  • Glyburide Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article describes various glyburide warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions and an increased risk of death for those with heart or blood vessel problems. This page also lists people who should avoid the drug.
  • Glynase
    Glynase is a prescription medicine that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the medication works, lists some potential side effects, and offers tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • Glynase Drug Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, Glynase can help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This segment discusses possible side effects, how the medication works, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Glypizide
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site features a brief overview of glipizide, a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This article also provides a link to more detailed information. Glypizide is a common misspelling of glipizide.
  • Goggi
    Goji is a shrub that is often used medicinally for treating and preventing various medical conditions. This eMedTV resource explores the effectiveness of goji and offers general warnings for these products. Goggi is a common misspelling of goji.
  • Goggie
    Goji is a natural product that may have blood pressure-lowering effects and antibacterial properties. This eMedTV Web page describes other effects and potential benefits of goji products. Goggie is a common misspelling of goji.
  • Gogi
    Goji is a plant that contains components that may be useful for treating certain health conditions. This eMedTV page describes various goji products and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using them. Gogi is a common misspelling of goji.
  • Gogie
    Goji supplements are used for treating and preventing numerous health conditions. This eMedTV article explores the benefits of goji and explains what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment. Gogie is a common misspelling of goji.
  • Gogii
    Goji is a natural product that is believed to have many health benefits, such as antibacterial properties. This eMedTV segment describes goji products in more detail and explores other effects of the plant. Gogii is a common misspelling of goji.
  • Goji
    Goji is a plant containing edible berries that are used in supplements, health foods, and health drinks. This eMedTV segment describes the compounds found in goji, explains what it is used for, and explores the effectiveness of these products.
  • Goji and Breastfeeding
    It is currently not clear whether goji is safe for breastfeeding women. This page on the eMedTV site offers a more in-depth look at goji and breastfeeding, and weighs some of the benefits and possible risks of using these products while nursing.
  • Goji and Pregnancy
    It is currently not known whether goji products are safe for using during pregnancy. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on goji and pregnancy, and lists some of the possible benefits and risks of using the product while pregnant.
  • Goji Berry Information
    Goji berry is often used in traditional Chinese medicine -- but what is it, exactly? This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of goji berry, with information on why it may not be suitable for some people. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Goji Dosage
    A safe and effective goji dosage has not been established at this time. This eMedTV page explains why it is difficult to determine a consistently safe and effective dose, and offers tips on finding a reliable product from a trustworthy manufacturer.
  • Goji Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, blood pressure medications, and diabetes medicines may cause goji drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, these drug interactions could increase the risk of bleeding, low blood sugar, and low blood pressure.
  • Goji Overdose
    It is not known what to expect from a goji overdose, or even if an overdose is possible. This part of the eMedTV library explores the possible symptoms of an overdose and explains what treatment options would be available.
  • Goji Side Effects
    At this time, there are no known goji side effects. As this eMedTV Web page explains, taking goji with the "blood thinner" warfarin may increase the risk of bleeding, but this may actually be a drug interaction rather than a true side effect.
  • Healthy Desserts for People With Type 2 Diabetes
    If you have type 2 diabetes, it's important to know how to work desserts into your diet in a healthy way. This eMedTV article provides tips on how to satisfy your sweet tooth without letting your blood sugar get out of control.
  • Healthy Eating for Diabetics
    A diet with more grains, fruits, and vegetables, and less sweets and fats is ideal for people with diabetes. This eMedTV segment offers many helpful meal-planning tips to encourage healthy eating for diabetics.
  • Herbal Medicine for Diabetes
    As explained in this eMedTV article, although it may seem appealing to treat diabetes with herbal medicine, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of this approach. This segment takes a look at treating diabetes with garlic and ginseng.
  • How Are Diabetes and High Blood Pressure Related?
    In many cases, people with diabetes also have high blood pressure, but are these two conditions related? This eMedTV page discusses the link between these two conditions, describing the dangers they pose to a person's health and how they can be managed.
  • How Can Diabetes Affect the Heart and Blood Vessels?
    This video clip talks about how diabetes can affect the heart and blood vessels.
  • How Can I Avoid Taking Insulin?
    Not everyone who has diabetes will need to take insulin shots. This eMedTV article explains how this depends on the type of diabetes a person has, as well as on how well the condition is controlled through oral drugs and lifestyle modifications.
  • How Changing Your Life Can Affect Your Type 2 Diabetes
    There are numerous ways to help improve your health with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how lifestyle changes like increasing your physical activity, eating healthier, and stopping smoking can affect your type 2 diabetes.
  • How Do I Get Blood to Test My Glucose?
    It's not hard to get blood from your fingertip to test your blood sugar -- this eMedTV article has the steps you need to know that make the process easy and minimize pain. (Unfortunately, it isn't pain-free!)
  • How Does Actoplus Met Work?
    This page from the eMedTV library explains that Actoplus Met works in a few different ways, mostly by helping blood sugar levels to stay low and improving the body's response to insulin. This page also includes a link to more information on this drug.
  • How Does Actos Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, Actos works to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels. This page further discusses how the prescription medication works, including information on the effectiveness of the drug.
  • How Does Amaryl Work?
    This eMedTV Web resource explains that Amaryl works to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels. This page further discusses the effects of this prescription medication and explains how it can help prevent long-term diabetes complications.
  • How Does Avandia Work?
    As this eMedTV Web resource explains, Avandia works to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels. This page further discusses how this prescription medication works, including information on the effectiveness of the drug.
  • How Does Diabetes Affect Nerves?
    Diabetic neuropathy is a common condition seen in people with diabetes. This video clip by eMedTV looks at this condition.
  • How Does Glipizide Work?
    As a sulfonylurea, glipizide works by helping the pancreas produce more insulin. This eMedTV article provides a brief explanation of how this medicine affects the body and provides a link to more information on this diabetes drug.
  • How Does Glyburide Work?
    Glyburide is a diabetes medication that has a few different effects in the body. As this eMedTV segment explains, this includes helping the pancreas make more insulin. This page explains how glyburide works and provides a link to more information.
  • How Does Januvia Work?
    If you are taking Januvia for type 2 diabetes, you may be curious about how it works. This eMedTV article gives a brief explanation of how the drug affects certain hormones in the body and provides a link to more information on the topic.
  • How Does Lantus Work?
    As explained in eMedTV page, Lantus works by providing a steady amount of insulin throughout the day, which helps the body remove sugar from the blood. This article offers more details on how the drug works and provides a link to more information.
  • How Does Metformin Work?
    Many people wonder, "How does metformin work?" As this eMedTV resource explains, the drug works in several ways to decrease blood sugar levels. It reduces the amount of sugar made by the liver and limits the amount of sugar absorbed from your diet.
  • How Is Diabetes Diagnosed?
    This multimedia clip explains how diabetes is diagnosed.
  • How Is Diabetes Insipidus Diagnosed?
    How is diabetes insipidus diagnosed? This eMedTV resource provides detailed information about how diabetes insipidus is diagnosed through urinalysis and a fluid deprivation test.
  • How Often Is an A1c Test Needed?
    How often should someone with diabetes have an A1c test? This segment of the eMedTV archives has the answer, listing the factors that can affect how often this test should be done. The range is anywhere from every three months to every three years.
  • How Safe Is an EGD?
    This multimedia clip explains the safety and risks of an EGD.
  • How Safe Is Cataract Surgery?
    This clip discusses the general safety of cataract surgery and lists possible complications.
  • How to Administer Glucagon
    This portion of the eMedTV library talks about how to administer glucagon, including how long it typically takes to start working. This Web page also provides a link to an in-depth article that offers complete information on the drug's dosing guidelines.
  • How to Take Care of Your Type 2 Diabetes
    Although it might seem overwhelming at first, taking care of your type 2 diabetes isn't hard. As this eMedTV page explains, however, it does require making a commitment to eating healthier, losing weight, and exercising more, one step at a time.
  • Humalog
    Humalog is a rapid-acting insulin licensed to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page describes how Humalog works, covers the drug's effectiveness, explains how and when to inject the medication, and lists possible side effects.
  • Humalog and Breastfeeding
    Humalog (insulin lispro) is considered safer than most oral diabetes drugs for breastfeeding women. This eMedTV article includes more information on Humalog and breastfeeding, and explains why the drug is probably safe for nursing babies.
  • Humalog and Pregnancy
    Humalog (insulin lispro) is generally considered safe for use during pregnancy. This page on the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Humalog and pregnancy, and discusses the potential dangers of high or low blood sugar in a pregnant woman.
  • Humalog Dosage
    There is no standard Humalog dosage that will work for all people or for the same person in all situations. This eMedTV Web page provides general Humalog dosing guidelines and explains how, when, and where to inject the prescription medication.
  • Humalog Drug Interactions
    Some of the medicines that may cause Humalog drug interactions include reserpine, MAOIs, and octreotide. As this eMedTV segment explains, drug interactions with Humalog can either increase blood sugar levels or cause dangerously low blood sugar.
  • Humalog Insulin Information
    Are you looking for information about Humalog? This part of the eMedTV site offers some basic information on this form of insulin, including some of the side effects that may occur during treatment.
  • Humalog Mix50/50
    Humalog Mix50/50 is a prescription drug used to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page describes how Humalog Mix50/50 works, explains when and how to use this form of insulin, and lists potential side effects of the product.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 and Breastfeeding
    Humalog Mix50/50 is not predicted to cause problems when used while breastfeeding. This eMedTV page contains more information on Humalog Mix 50/50 and breastfeeding, including an explanation of what will happen if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 and Pregnancy
    Humalog Mix50/50 is not predicted to cause problems for pregnant women when used appropriately. As this eMedTV page explains, if you are using Humalog Mix50/50 and pregnancy occurs, be aware that pregnancy may affect your insulin requirements.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Dosage
    There is no "standard" Humalog Mix50/50 dosage that will work for all people. As this eMedTV segment explains, dosing is individualized for each person, based on their blood sugar levels and carbohydrate content of their meals, among other things.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Drug Interactions
    Beta blockers, fluoxetine, and salicylates are drugs that may cause Humalog Mix50/50 drug interactions. As this eMedTV resource explains, drug interactions with this diabetes medicine may lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels, which can be fatal.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Insulin
    A combination diabetes drug, Humalog Mix50/50 contains a long-acting and a rapid-acting insulin. This eMedTV resource gives an overview of the active ingredients in this product, as well as how to use it and what to expect.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Overdose
    A Humalog Mix50/50 overdose can cause low blood sugar levels, which can be dangerous. This eMedTV article lists early and late symptoms of low blood sugar and also explains what treatments are available for people who overdose on this medication.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Side Effects
    Potential Humalog Mix50/50 side effects include certain types of skin reactions and low blood sugar. As this eMedTV Web page explains, any signs of low blood sugar (such as sweating, seizures, or blurry vision) should be reported to your doctor.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Uses
    Humalog Mix50/50 is used for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes in adults. This article from the eMedTV Web site offers more details on Humalog Mix50/50 uses and explains how this form of insulin works to control blood sugar levels.
  • Humalog Mix50/50 Warnings and Precautions
    In order to avoid dangerously low blood sugar, start eating within 15 minutes of using Humalog Mix50/50. This eMedTV segment lists other Humalog Mix50/50 warnings and precautions, and includes information on who should not use this form of insulin.
  • Humalog Overdose
    Possible symptoms of a Humalog (insulin lispro) overdose include sweating, blurred vision, and dizziness. This eMedTV segment lists more symptoms of low blood sugar that may occur with an overdose of Humalog and explains how an overdose is treated.
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