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Generic Glipizide - Glipizide Oral

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Glipizide to Glipizide Oral. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Glipizide
    This eMedTV segment explains that there is a generic glipizide available in two strengths: 5 mg and 10 mg. This page also explains how the FDA rates generic medications and what this means with regards to glipizide.
  • Generic Glucagon
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, glucagon is currently available as a brand-name drug only. This resource explains why you can't buy an authorized generic version of glucagon and talks about using glucagon kits sold by other manufacturers.
  • Generic Glucovance
    As this selection from the eMedTV archives explains, generic Glucovance is currently available. This article lists the strengths in which it can be bought and describes how it compares to brand-name Glucovance.
  • Generic Glyburide
    This portion of the eMedTV archives highlights the various strengths of generic glyburide and micronized glyburide that are currently available. This page also explains why there is no recognized generic version of DiaBeta available.
  • Generic Glynase
    This eMedTV segment explains that generic Glynase is currently available in four different strengths and is sold under the name Micronized Glyburide tablets. This page also explains why the FDA has assigned an "AB" rating to the drug.
  • Generic Humalog
    At this time, no generic versions of Humalog (insulin lispro) are available. This article from the eMedTV Web site explains in detail why generic Humalog products are not allowed to be manufactured in the United States at this time.
  • Generic Humalog Mix50/50
    At this time, it is not known when (or even if) a generic form of Humalog Mix50/50 will be available. This eMedTV article describes the obstacles that are currently preventing generic versions of this diabetes drug from being produced.
  • Generic Humulin 50/50
    Currently, it is not known when (or even if) a generic Humulin 50/50 product will be available. This eMedTV Web resource explains how current legislation prevents any generic versions of any type of insulin from being manufactured in the United States.
  • Generic Humulin 70/30
    At this time, no generic Humulin 70/30 products are available on the market. As this eMedTV resource explains, Humulin 70/30 is a "biologic" medicine, and generic biologics are not allowed to be manufactured in the United States.
  • Generic Humulin N
    Generic "biologic" drugs, including generic Humulin N, are not allowed to be manufactured in the U.S. This eMedTV article explains why biologic drugs cannot be made into generics and explains the difference between NPH insulin and generic Humulin N.
  • Generic Humulin R
    There are currently no generic insulin medications in the United States, including generic Humulin R. This eMedTV page explains why insulin drugs are not made into generic forms and explores whether generic Humulin R will be available in the future.
  • Generic Insulin
    Generic "biologic" drugs, including insulin, are not allowed to be manufactured in the United States. This eMedTV page discusses why there may never be generic insulin available and explains why insurance companies may only cover certain insulins.
  • Generic Invokana
    At this time, Invokana (canagliflozin) is not available in generic form. This eMedTV Web selection talks about when the drug's first patent is set to expire and when to expect a generic version.
  • Generic Irbesartan
    As explained in this article from the eMedTV Web site, you can now purchase generic irbesartan. This page gives an overview of this topic and lists some of the companies that make the generic versions.
  • Generic Janumet XR
    At this time, Janumet XR (sitagliptin and metformin extended-release) is not available in a generic form. This eMedTV Web selection discusses why companies are not allowed to make a generic Janumet XR product until after April 2017.
  • Generic Januvia
    There is no approved generic Januvia licensed for sale. This segment from the eMedTV Web site explains why there are no generic versions of Januvia on the market. This Web page also discusses when generic Januvia may be available.
  • Generic Jentadueto
    As explained in this eMedTV page, Jentadueto (linagliptin/metformin) is protected by patents that prevent any company from making a generic product. This article explains when a generic Jentadueto might be sold and whether this product is cost effective.
  • Generic Kazano
    At this time, generic Kazano (alogliptin and metformin) is not available. This eMedTV article explains why companies are not allowed to make a generic version. This page also describes the difference between a generic name and generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Kombiglyze XR
    This segment of the eMedTV site explains that generic Kombiglyze XR will not be available until the patents protecting the drug expire. This page also looks at the pros and cons of taking Kombiglyze XR versus taking the individual components separately.
  • Generic Lantus
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library explains why there is currently no approved generic Lantus (insulin glargine) available. This page also discusses how certain rules and laws may never allow a generic Lantus product to be manufactured.
  • Generic Levemir
    There are no generic versions of Levemir (insulin detemir) available at this time. This eMedTV page explains how certain laws prevent generic Levemir from being manufactured because this diabetes medicine is considered a "biologic" medication.
  • Generic Losartan
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, generic losartan is now available. This article offers more details on the generic version, listing the strengths in which it is available and offering details on the company that markets the medication.
  • Generic Metaglip
    This eMedTV Web page outlines the different strengths of generic Metaglip available and also explains why the generic form is equivalent to the brand-name drug. A brief explanation of how the FDA rates generic drugs is also provided.
  • Generic Metanx
    There are no generic Metanx products available. This article from the eMedTV Web library explains why this is the case and takes a closer look at whether it is cheaper to take the individual vitamins in the product separately.
  • Generic Metformin
    Metformin is available for sale as a generic and comes in many different strengths. This portion of the eMedTV library highlights the various strengths of the metformin generic drugs and also lists some of the manufacturers of the medications.
  • Generic Micronase
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic versions of Micronase are available in three strengths and are made by a number of manufacturers. This article offers more detailed information on the generic drugs, including how they compare to brand-name Micronase.
  • Generic Nesina
    Nesina (alogliptin) is not available for sale in generic form. This selection from the eMedTV Web site examines why companies are not allowed to make a generic Nesina and also describes the difference between a generic name and generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Novolin 70/30
    Laws currently prevent any generic versions of Novolin 70/30 from being made in the United States. This eMedTV Web page explains why these laws are in place and explores when generic forms of insulin may become available.
  • Generic Novolin R
    Novolin R (regular insulin) is currently not available in generic form. This selection from the eMedTV Web library explores why generic Novolin R is not available and explains the difference between regular insulin and generic Novolin R.
  • Generic NovoLog
    NovoLog (insulin aspart) is currently not available in generic form. This section of the eMedTV library explores why generic NovoLog is not available and explains the difference between insulin aspart and generic NovoLog.
  • Generic NovoLog Mix 50/50
    There are currently no generic versions of NovoLog Mix 50/50 available in the United States. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains why there are no generic NovoLog Mix 50/50 products and explores when the drug may be available in generic form.
  • Generic Onglyza
    At this time, there are no generic versions of Onglyza licensed for sale. This segment from the eMedTV archives offers information on why Onglyza is not available in generic form and explains when generic versions of the drug could become available.
  • Generic Oseni
    You cannot buy a generic Oseni (alogliptin pioglitazone) product at this time. This eMedTV Web selection explains why companies are not allowed to make generic versions. It also explores whether such a product will be available in the future.
  • Generic PrandiMet
    This selection from the eMedTV site explains why there is currently no approved generic PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin). The page also explains why it's hard to say when a generic form could become available.
  • Generic Prandin
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, generic Prandin (repaglinide) is now available in the United States. The article talks in detail about the generic versions, exploring the available strengths, who makes them, and more.
  • Generic Precose
    Generic versions of Precose are currently available in three strengths. This part of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at generic Precose, including how the drug compares to brand-name Precose.
  • Generic Starlix
    This portion of the eMedTV library explains that generic Starlix is currently available. This article takes a closer look at the strengths of the generic versions and discusses how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Symlin
    This page of the eMedTV library discusses why there is currently no approved generic Symlin available. It also explores when a generic version could be introduced and warns against buying unapproved generics.
  • Generic Tradjenta
    There are no generic Tradjenta (linagliptin) products available at this time. This selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses why a generic version of this drug does not exist and explains when a generic product might become available.
  • Generic Victoza
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, Victoza (liraglutide) is not currently available in generic form. This article discusses when the drug's patent is predicted to expire and explains why liraglutide is not considered a generic version of Victoza.
  • Genovia
    Januvia is a prescription medicine licensed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This page on the eMedTV Web site describes Januvia in more detail and explains how the drug works to lower blood sugar. Genovia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Genuvia
    Januvia is a drug that may be used to lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article features a brief overview of Januvia and includes a link to more information about the drug. Genuvia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Get an Annual Hearing Test
    Don't assume your hearing loss is just a part of aging. Diabetes is also linked to hearing problems. It's not yet clear how or why hearing loss is more common in people with diabetes, but scientists suspect that years of high blood sugar may damage the blood vessels of the ears. An annual hearing exam is probably a good idea for people with diabetes to help identify and deal with hearing loss early.
  • Get Off the Couch
    Staying active is good for your heart, your bones and joints, and your diabetes! But it doesn't have to be a dreadful chore. Pick activities you like -- perhaps gardening or relaxing walks -- and build them into your routine.
  • Getting Started (EGD With Dilation)
    This multimedia clip explains what will happen as you are prepared for surgery.
  • Give Up Those Vices
    Smoking and alcohol consumption are risk factors for many different health problems, and they may contribute to the development of diabetic neuropathy (although not all studies agree on this issue). Stopping smoking and cutting back on your alcohol consumption can help you lead a healthier life overall and might possibly reduce your chance of getting diabetic neuropathy.
  • Gliburide
    This eMedTV resource describes how glyburide works to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. It also lists possible symptoms of a glyburide overdose and links to more information. Gliburide is a common misspelling of glyburide.
  • Glipazide
    Glipizide may be prescribed to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works and lists some potential side effects to be aware of. Glipazide is a common misspelling of glipizide.
  • Glipizide
    Glipizide is a prescription medicine that is approved to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works to help the pancreas produce more insulin, outlines potential side effects, and more.
  • Glipizide 10 mg Tablets
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, glipizide tablets are available in many strengths, the most powerful being 10 mg. This article looks at the other strengths of glipizide and provides a link to more details on this prescription diabetes drug.
  • Glipizide 2.5 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, the lowest strength available for extended-release glipizide tablets is 2.5 mg. This article discusses the other strengths of glipizide and offers some basic dosing guidelines to keep in mind.
  • Glipizide 5 mg Tablets
    Both regular-strength and extended-release glipizide tablets are available in a 5-mg strength. This eMedTV selection talks about how your healthcare provider will determine the glipizide dosage that is right for you, based on your unique situation.
  • Glipizide Alternatives
    This segment of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at some of the glipizide alternatives available, such as lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications. This page also explains when an alternative to glipizide might be necessary.
  • Glipizide and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, low and high blood sugar levels are possible effects of glipizide. Blood sugar levels can cause serious or even life-threatening complications, which this page also highlights. Possible symptoms are listed as well.
  • Glipizide and Depression
    This eMedTV article explores glipizide and depression, explaining why depression does not appear to be a common side effect of the drug. This page also highlights some symptoms of depression, such as feelings of hopelessness and decreased energy.
  • Glipizide and Diabetes Control
    As explained in this eMedTV page, glipizide can help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article tells you what you need to know about controlling diabetes with glipizide and includes a link to more information on this medicine.
  • Glipizide Diabetic Drug Information
    This eMedTV article provides helpful information on glipizide, a drug for people with type 2 diabetes. Topics discussed in this article include potential side effects and issues to discuss with your doctor. A link to more information is also included.
  • Glipizide Diabetic Medication
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend a drug called glipizide. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of glipizide, with information on the medication's side effects, warnings, and more.
  • Glipizide Dosing
    Generally, the recommended glipizide dose when first taking it is 5 mg a day, taken before breakfast. This eMedTV resource outlines the factors that will affect glipizide dosing guidelines and lists some tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • Glipizide Drug Interactions
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explores potential glipizide drug interactions with other medications, such as thyroid medications, diuretics, and oral contraceptives. This page also explains how these interactions can lead to problems.
  • Glipizide Effectiveness
    As this eMedTV page explains, glipizide is a diabetes medicine that has been shown to lower blood sugar. This page discusses the effectiveness of glipizide in some detail and includes a link to more in-depth information on the drug.
  • Glipizide ER (Extended-Release)
    As this eMedTV page explains, glipizide extended-release (ER) tablets release the medication slowly; this keeps a more even level of the diabetes medicine in your blood. This article also explains why this product may not be the best choice for everyone.
  • Glipizide Oral
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web site, glipizide is an oral medication used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article looks at some of the drug's dosing guidelines and provides a link to more in-depth information.
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