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Glipizide Overdose - Glumetza Information

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Glipizide Overdose to Glumetza Information. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Glipizide Overdose
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site describes possible symptoms of a glipizide overdose, such as cold sweats, shakiness, and blurry vision. Treatment options are also described, for both recent and not-so-recent overdoses.
  • Glipizide Pills
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may recommend glipizide. As this eMedTV page explains, glipizide pills are taken by mouth, typically once or twice a day. This article also offers dosing guidelines for the extended-release form.
  • Glipizide Problems
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, glipizide can cause dizziness, diarrhea, and other side effects, but it is generally well tolerated. This resource lists other problems that can occur with glipizide and provides links to more detailed information.
  • Glipizide Risks
    Most people are able to take glipizide without any problems; however, the drug is not without risks. This eMedTV resource looks at some of the side effects that can occur with this drug and explains why it may not be the best choice for certain people.
  • Glipizide Sexual Side Effects
    This eMedTV Web page explains that during studies of glipizide extended release, a decreased libido was reported as a rare side effect of the medication. This page also describes what to do if, while taking glipizide, sexual side effects occur.
  • Glipizide Strengths
    As explained in this eMedTV article, the diabetes drug glipizide comes in a number of strengths, ranging from 2.5 mg to 10 mg. This resource lists all of the currently available strengths and provides a link to more detailed information.
  • Glipizide Substitutes
    If glipizide isn't working for you, your healthcare provider may substitute another diabetes medication. This eMedTV page lists other diabetes drugs that are sometimes used as substitutes for glipizide and provides a link to more information.
  • Glipizide to Lower Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV segment explains, glipizide is used to help lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article talks in more detail about keeping your blood sugar under control and provides a link to more information on glipizide.
  • Glipizide Type 2 Diabetes Medicine
    As this eMedTV segment explains, glipizide is a prescription medicine used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This article offers a brief overview of this product and provides a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Glipizide Uses
    This eMedTV page explains how glipizide lowers blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes by increasing insulin production in the pancreas. This page also discusses off-label glipizide uses and why the drug is not used for type 1 diabetes.
  • Glipizide Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page takes a look at several glipizide warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions, people who should not take the drug, and possible side effects. Things to discuss with your doctor before taking it are also included.
  • Glipzide
    This eMedTV page explains that glipizide is a prescription drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This page also includes information on how it works, potential side effects, and general dosing guidelines. Glipzide is a common misspelling of glipizide.
  • Glucagon
    Glucagon is a hormone that is injected in cases of severe low blood sugar. This eMedTV segment discusses this potentially lifesaving drug, with information on how it works, how it is given, possible side effects, and more.
  • Glucagon Administration
    This eMedTV Web resource takes a quick look at the administration of glucagon, a potentially lifesaving treatment for severe low blood sugar. This article lists companies that manufacture the product and provides a link to more information.
  • Glucagon and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if glucagon passes through breast milk. However, as this eMedTV page explains, the risk of problems in the nursing child is quite low. This article covers glucagon and breastfeeding, explaining why it is generally considered safe.
  • Glucagon and Pregnancy
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, glucagon is generally considered safe for pregnant women. This article explains the results of animal studies on this topic and also describes the different pregnancy classifications the FDA gives to drugs.
  • Glucagon Dosage
    The standard dosage of glucagon in adults is an injection of 1 mg (1 unit). This eMedTV selection takes you through the dosing guidelines for this product, explaining how it is used in emergency situations and how to increase blood sugar safely.
  • Glucagon Dosing
    Most adults require a glucagon dosage of 1 mg (1 unit) in order to treat severe low blood sugar. This eMedTV article discusses glucagon's dosing guidelines in some detail and lists some of the factors that will affect the amount you should take.
  • Glucagon Drug Interactions
    Beta blockers and certain other medications may cause drug interactions with glucagon. This article from the eMedTV library lists these specific beta blockers and explains what problems may occur if they are taken with glucagon.
  • Glucagon Emergency Kit
    This eMedTV article explains that if you are at risk of severe low blood sugar, your healthcare provider may prescribe a glucagon kit for use in emergency situations. This article talks about what each kit contains and provides a link to more information.
  • Glucagon Injection
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, glucagon injections are most often used to treat severely low blood sugar. This article gives a brief overview of glucagon and its dosing guidelines. A link to more detailed information is also included.
  • Glucagon Injection Kit
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, if you have a tendency to develop low blood sugar, your healthcare provider will likely recommend having a glucagon injection kit in case of an emergency. This article gives a brief overview of this product.
  • Glucagon Injections
    This eMedTV article lists some helpful tips to keep in mind with glucagon injections, including where to administer them. This segment also explains why it's important to avoid having a person lie flat on their back after receiving an injection.
  • Glucagon Instructions
    Each glucagon kit comes with instructions on how to give the injection. This selection from the eMedTV archives gives some basic dosing guidelines on how to administer this medication and provides a link to more details on this topic.
  • Glucagon Medication Information
    This page from the eMedTV site offers important information on glucagon, an injected medication used to treat severely low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). This article gives an overview of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information on it.
  • Glucagon Overdose
    As this eMedTV article explains, an overdose of glucagon is not likely to cause serious problems, but still requires medical care. This article describes in detail what can happen if people use too much of this medication and treatment options.
  • Glucagon Side Effects
    As this eMedTV page explains, side effects are uncommon with glucagon. When they do occur, they may include such things as nausea, vomiting, and a short-term increase in heart rate. This article also explains the lack of placebo-controlled studies.
  • Glucagon Uses
    Glucagon is approved to treat dangerously low blood sugar in adults and children. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at the uses of glucagon, including information on how the hormone works and why it may sometimes be used "off-label."
  • Glucagon Warnings and Precautions
    Using glucagon in a person with a pheochromocytoma could result in dangerously high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource lists a number of other warnings and precautions for glucagon, including more information on who should avoid the drug.
  • Glucagone
    In the event of a blood sugar emergency, glucagon could save your life. This eMedTV Web page takes a quick look at this drug, including a link to more detailed information. Glucagone is a common misspelling of glucagon.
  • Glucogon
    Glucagon is often injected in cases of extreme low blood sugar. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of this medication and includes a link to more detailed information on it. Glucogon is a common misspelling of glucagon.
  • Glucogon Hypokit
    As explained in this eMedTV Web page, a GlucaGen HypoKit contains everything you need to inject glucagon. This article explains who makes this product and links to more information. Glucogon hypokit is a common misspelling and variation of glucagon.
  • Glucovance
    Glucovance is a prescription medicine that is used to control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works, outlines some potential side effects, and provides some tips for taking the medication.
  • Glucovance Alternatives
    This eMedTV segment outlines alternatives to Glucovance -- including lifestyle changes, other oral diabetes medicines, and insulin or other injectable diabetes drugs -- and discusses situations in which Glucovance alternatives may be necessary.
  • Glucovance and Hypoglycemia
    Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is among the possible side effects of Glucovance. This eMedTV Web page explores hypoglycemia and Glucovance, noting some symptoms of low blood sugar (such as sweating or shakiness) and what to do if these problems occur.
  • Glucovance and Pregnancy
    It is generally considered safe to take Glucovance during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment explores Glucovance and pregnancy and explains how the FDA categorizes Glucovance as a pregnancy Category B medication.
  • Glucovance Dosage
    For those who aren't taking metformin or glyburide, Glucovance dosing starts at 1.25 mg/250 mg once daily. This eMedTV resource outlines some tips on when and how to take the drug and also lists the factors that will determine your Glucovance dosage.
  • Glucovance Drug Info
    If you have high blood sugar due to type 2 diabetes, you may benefit from Glucovance. This eMedTV Web page provides some basic information on Glucovance, including what to expect, how to take it, and important drug warnings.
  • Glucovance Drug Interactions
    Diuretics and niacin are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Glucovance. As this eMedTV segment explains, Glucovance drug interactions can raise the level of Glucovance in the blood or make Glucovance less effective, among other things.
  • Glucovance Overdose
    It is possible to overdose on Glucovance. This eMedTV resource outlines some of the possible symptoms of a Glucovance overdose, such as blurry vision, dizziness, and cold sweats. This page also describes some treatment options for a recent overdose.
  • Glucovance Side Affects
    This portion of the eMedTV archives explains that there are potential side effects of Glucovance, such as diarrhea, low blood sugar, and upper respiratory infections. Glucovance side affects is a common misspelling of Glucovance side effects.
  • Glucovance Side Effects
    Some common Glucovance side effects include diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web page also takes an in-depth look at some more serious side effects of the drug, such as chest pain and signs of an allergic reaction or lactic acidosis.
  • Glucovance Uses
    This page on the eMedTV site explains that Glucovance is used to treat type 2 diabetes, but is not effective at treating type 1 diabetes. The drug is not recommended for use in children, and there are no universally accepted off-label Glucovance uses.
  • Glucovance Warnings and Precautions
    This page on the eMedTV Web site examines a number of Glucovance warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions and the risk of low blood sugar in some people taking this drug. This page also discusses who should not take Glucovance.
  • Glumetza
    Glumetza is a medication approved to help manage type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page describes in detail how the drug works and offers a general overview of its effects, potential side effects, dosing information, and more.
  • Glumetza Dosing
    The suggested Glumetza dose for those who are first starting treatment is 1000 mg once daily. This eMedTV article also offers Glumetza dosing recommendations for those who are taking insulin and lists tips and precautions for taking the medicine.
  • Glumetza Information
    This eMedTV resource provides some important information on Glumetza, a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes. This page briefly explains what sets Glumetza apart from other long-acting forms of metformin and gives some basic dosing guidelines.
  • Glyberide
    This eMedTV article explains that glyburide helps to treat type 2 diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels. Possible side effects are also listed, as are factors that determine the dosage prescribed. Glyberide is a common misspelling of glyburide.
  • Glyburid
    This eMedTV Web article offers an overview of glyburide, a medication prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This page also covers some dosing guidelines and general precautions of the medication. Glyburid is a common misspelling of glyburide.
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