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Novolin R Drug Interactions - PrandiMet Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Novolin R Drug Interactions to PrandiMet Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Novolin R Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause Novolin R drug interactions include MAOIs, fibrates, and sulfa drugs. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may interact with Novolin R and describes the potentially dangerous effects of these drug interactions.
  • Novolin R Insulin Information
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on Novolin R, an insulin medication that is used to treat diabetes. This Web page also gives guidelines on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Novolin R Overdose
    A Novolin R (regular insulin) overdose can cause low blood sugar levels, which can be very dangerous. This eMedTV Web resource describes possible symptoms of low blood sugar levels and explains what steps can be taken to treat a Novolin R overdose.
  • Novolin R Side Effects
    Potential Novolin R side effects include skin reactions and low blood sugar levels. As this eMedTV page explains, any symptoms of low blood sugar (such as dizziness and confusion) are potentially serious and should be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • Novolin R Uses
    Novolin R is used for controlling blood sugar levels in adults and children with diabetes. This page from the eMedTV Web library takes an in-depth look at Novolin R uses, including how this type of insulin works and possible off-label uses.
  • Novolin R Warnings and Precautions
    Before using Novolin R, talk to your doctor about your medical history and any other drugs you are taking. This eMedTV page lists important Novolin R warnings and precautions to be aware of before using this insulin, including who should not use it.
  • NovoLog
    NovoLog is a rapid-acting insulin approved for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how and when to use NovoLog, describes the effects of the medication, and lists potential side effects to look out for during treatment.
  • NovoLog 70/30 Pen Information
    As this eMedTV page explains, the diabetes drug NovoLog Mix 70/30 is available in pens or vials. This article gives an overview of this prescription medication, with information on how to ensure your safety while using it.
  • NovoLog and Breastfeeding
    NovoLog (insulin aspart) is generally considered to be safe for use in breastfeeding women. This eMedTV page covers NovoLog and breastfeeding in more detail and explains why the drug is unlikely to be dangerous even if it passes through breast milk.
  • NovoLog and Pregnancy
    Animal studies suggest that NovoLog (insulin aspart) is safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV segment includes more information on NovoLog and pregnancy, and explores the risk of high or low blood sugar in pregnant women.
  • NovoLog Dosage
    As with other rapid-acting insulins, there is no standard dose for NovoLog. This article from the eMedTV archives offers general NovoLog dosage guidelines and includes information on how, when, and where to inject the medication.
  • NovoLog Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause NovoLog drug interactions include salicylates, disopyramide, and reserpine. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may interact with NovoLog and describes the potentially dangerous effects of these drug interactions.
  • NovoLog Insulin
    This eMedTV Web page provides some information on NovoLog, an insulin medication used to treat diabetes. This page talks about how it compares to regular human insulin and explains what to discuss with the doctor prescribing it.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50
    NovoLog Mix 50/50 is a prescription insulin used for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of NovoLog Mix 50/50, explains how it works to control blood sugar, and offers general dosing guidelines for the drug.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 and Breastfeeding
    NovoLog Mix 50/50 is not expected to cause any problems in a breastfeeding woman or her infant. This eMedTV page offers a more in-depth look at NovoLog Mix 50/50 and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug is likely to pass through breast milk.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 and Pregnancy
    The full risks of using NovoLog Mix 50/50 during pregnancy are not known at this time. This eMedTV resource offers more information on NovoLog Mix 50/50 and pregnancy, and discusses the safety of using this form of insulin while pregnant.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Dosage
    No standard NovoLog Mix 50/50 dosage will work for all people or even for the same person in all situations. This eMedTV page offers tips on determining an appropriate NovoLog Mix 50/50 dose and includes general information on how to inject the drug.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Drug Interactions
    Medications that may interact with NovoLog Mix 50/50 include fibrates, reserpine, and salicylates. As this eMedTV Web page explains, some NovoLog Mix 50/50 drug interactions can result in dangerously low blood sugar levels.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Insulin
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, NovoLog Mix 50/50 may be prescribed to keep your blood sugar under control. This article provides some basic information on this product and includes a link to learn more.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Overdose
    A NovoLog Mix 50/50 overdose may result in blurry vision, dizziness, and loss of coordination. This eMedTV article lists early, late, and severe symptoms of an overdose and explains what treatments are available.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Side Effects
    Potential NovoLog Mix 50/50 side effects include low blood sugar and injection site skin reactions. This eMedTV segment describes these side effects in more detail and explains which symptoms should be reported to your doctor.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Uses
    NovoLog Mix 50/50 is used for treating type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page explains how this form of insulin works, lists possible off-label NovoLog Mix 50/50 uses, and discusses the use of this drug in children.
  • NovoLog Mix 50/50 Warnings and Precautions
    If you have kidney or liver disease, let your doctor know before using NovoLog Mix 50/50. This eMedTV segment provides other NovoLog Mix 50/50 warnings and precautions, including information on who should not use this form of insulin.
  • NovoLog Overdose
    Often, a NovoLog (insulin aspart) overdose can cause low blood sugar levels, which can be very dangerous. This eMedTV resource lists symptoms of low blood sugar and explains what steps can be taken to treat a NovoLog overdose.
  • NovoLog Side Affects
    Injection site reactions and low blood sugar levels are possible side effects of NovoLog. This eMedTV article also lists signs of potentially serious NovoLog side effects. NovoLog side affects is a common misspelling of NovoLog side effects.
  • NovoLog Side Effects
    Potential NovoLog side effects include injection site skin reactions and low blood sugar. As this page from the eMedTV site explains, any symptoms of low blood sugar are potentially serious and should be reported to your doctor immediately.
  • NovoLog Uses
    NovoLog is used for controlling blood sugar levels in adults and children with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV segment describes how this medication works for diabetes and discusses possible off-label NovoLog uses.
  • NovoLog Warnings and Precautions
    Talk to your doctor before using NovoLog if you have liver disease. This eMedTV page lists other conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting NovoLog. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this drug are also included here.
  • NPH Insulin
    An intermediate-acting diabetes drug, NPH insulin is used to control blood sugar in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how NPH insulin works and offers more information on the drug's effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • NPH Insulin Dosage
    There is no standard NPH insulin dosage, but the drug is typically taken once or twice daily. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on NPH insulin dosing and includes general tips and precautions on how to use this form of insulin.
  • NPH Insulin Information
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV Web library, NPH insulin is a medication used to treat diabetes. This article provides more information on this nonprescription medication, including how often it is taken.
  • Numbness, Tingling, and Pain
    Symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can be subtle at first and come on slowly. One of the most common signs is numbness, tingling, or pain -- particularly in the hands, feet, toes, legs, fingers, and arms. The feet and legs are likely to be affected before the hands and arms, which is why good foot care is so important for someone with diabetes.
  • Onglyza
    The prescription drug Onglyza is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. This article from the eMedTV library describes the benefits of this product, explains how it works, and offers information on when and how to take this medication.
  • Onglyza Alternatives
    There are a few alternatives to Onglyza, including insulin, lifestyle changes, and other diabetes drugs. This eMedTV page further explores these alternatives for treating diabetes and lists various types of diabetes medicines currently available.
  • Onglyza and Breastfeeding
    It is currently unknown whether it is safe for breastfeeding women to take Onglyza. This eMedTV Web page explains whether Onglyza passes through breast milk and whether negative effects are likely to occur in a breastfed infant.
  • Onglyza and Pregnancy
    As this part of the eMedTV library explains, it is probably safe for pregnant women to take Onglyza. This article explains whether problems occurred when the drug was given to pregnant animals and discusses the use of this drug in pregnant humans.
  • Onglyza Dosage
    The standard recommended dose of Onglyza for most people with type 2 diabetes is 5 mg once daily. As this eMedTV page explains, some people may need a lower dosage, including those with severe kidney disease or who are taking certain other drugs.
  • Onglyza Interactions
    If you take Onglyza with sulfonylureas, nefazodone, or certain antibiotics, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV segment lists other medications that may interact with Onglyza and explains what may happen if these drugs are taken together.
  • Onglyza Medication Information
    This selection from the eMedTV site provides information on Onglyza, a medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This article tells you what you need to know about side effects, dosing, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more.
  • Onglyza Overdose
    It is probably possible to overdose on Onglyza, but the potential effects of the overdose are unknown. This eMedTV page explains what happened when high doses of Onglyza were given in clinical studies and explores possible overdose treatment options.
  • Onglyza Side Effects
    Common side effects of Onglyza may include abdominal pain, sinus infection, and headaches. This eMedTV resource lists other possible side effects of the drug, including potentially serious problems that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Onglyza Uses
    Onglyza is approved for treating type 2 diabetes in adults. This segment from the eMedTV Web site discusses the approved uses for Onglyza in more detail, describes how the drug works, and explains whether it is used for off-label purposes.
  • Onglyza Warnings and Precautions
    You should talk to your doctor before taking Onglyza if you have kidney disease. This eMedTV page explains what else you should tell your doctor before starting this drug. Warnings and precautions on who should not use Onglyza are also listed here.
  • Only Overweight People Get Type 2 Diabetes
    Fiction. Being overweight or obese definitely increases your risk for type 2 diabetes, but there are plenty of average-weight or thin people with the condition too. Most people who are overweight or obese will never develop type 2 diabetes. It appears that genetics plays a huge role, in combination with lifestyle factors.
  • Only Type 1 Diabetes Is Genetic
    Fiction. While genetics plays a role in the development of both types of diabetes, surprisingly, there is more of a genetic link for type 2 diabetes, compared with type 1. Type 2 diabetes tends to run in families, both because of the genetic link and also because of lifestyle choices passed on from generation to generation.
  • Options for Mealtime Insulin
    Learn about your mealtime insulin options in this video from eMedTV.com.
  • Osena
    Oseni is a combination medicine prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This part of the eMedTV Web library describes how this drug lowers blood sugar levels and explains how often it should be taken. Osena is a common misspelling of Oseni.
  • Oseni
    Oseni is a prescription drug used to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how the drug works, lists potential side effects, describes dosing guidelines, and covers a number of other topics.
  • Oseni Alternatives
    Numerous alternatives are available if Oseni (alogliptin and pioglitazone) is not working for you. This eMedTV Web page takes a detailed look at how lifestyle changes and other diabetes medications may be substituted for Oseni to treat type 2 diabetes.
  • Oseni and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV segment explains, it is generally recommended that Oseni (alogliptin and pioglitazone) not be used while breastfeeding. This page examines whether this drug passes through breast milk and the potential risks it may cause.
  • Oseni and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV segment addresses the potential risks of using Oseni (alogliptin and pioglitazone) during pregnancy. This includes information on the animal research that has been done and when a healthcare provider may prescribe this drug to pregnant women.
  • Oseni Dosage
    This eMedTV article discusses the guidelines your healthcare provider will follow to determine an appropriate Oseni dosage for your individual situation. This article also lists some tips for how to take these tablets most effectively.
  • Oseni Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV segment takes an in-depth look at potential interactions between Oseni and other drugs, such as insulin, secretagogues, and bile acid sequestrants. This page also explains how these combinations can lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels.
  • Oseni Medication Information
    As a type of diabetes drug, Oseni can help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV selection includes more information on how Oseni works and explains what side effects may occur with the use of this medication.
  • Oseni Overdose
    It is possible to take an Oseni (alogliptin and pioglitazone) overdose. However, as this eMedTV Web article explains, the full effects this might cause are unknown at this time. This page also examines some possible treatment options.
  • Oseni Side Effects
    Back pain, a runny nose, and a sore throat are some of the most common Oseni side effects. This eMedTV resource also examines some of the more serious reactions that may occur with this drug, such as signs of pancreatitis or liver problems.
  • Oseni Uses
    By controlling blood sugar levels, Oseni can help treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web selection describes how this medicine works and discusses whether Oseni can be used in children and older adults.
  • Oseni Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV resource explores various Oseni warnings and precautions, such as potential drug interactions, allergic reactions, and other complications. This article also describes situations where this medication may not be suitable for use.
  • Osenni
    Oseni is a medication used for lowering blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page explains how this drug works and lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before starting it. Osenni is a common misspelling of Oseni.
  • Other EGD With Dilation Complications
    This video clip discusses major complications with this procedure and possible outcomes.
  • Other Meds Like Metanx
    Folast, Foltx, and Folbic tablets are similar products to Metanx. This eMedTV article explores other meds like Metanx, and explains why there are no generic versions of this vitamin available. A link to more details is also included.
  • Overcome Barriers
    Once you've identified what is holding you back, it's time to find solutions. Talk with your healthcare provider, nutritionist, diabetes educator, and pharmacist. Find realistic, achievable ways to keep your blood sugar in a safe and healthy range. Be completely honest; holding back the truth will do you no good. Maybe a medication change is in order. Maybe a bit of dietary modification is the solution. Whatever the answer, get as educated as you can. It will help keep you motivated and may help remove some fears.
  • People With Diabetes Can Eat Sweets
    Fact. Diabetes is not an allergy to sugar (thank goodness!). No foods are strictly off-limits for people with diabetes. However, people with type 2 diabetes do need to be mindful of how their diets affect their blood sugar, and this may mean limiting (but not necessarily cutting out) sweets.
  • People With Type 2 Diabetes Don't Use Insulin
    Fiction. This common myth was perpetuated by the old name for type 1 diabetes: insulin-dependent diabetes, which implies that only people with type 1 diabetes use insulin. While the vast majority of people with early type 2 diabetes don't need insulin (but can be treated with lifestyle changes and noninsulin medications), many people with longstanding type 2 diabetes will eventually need to be on insulin. This doesn't mean they've somehow converted to type 1 diabetes.
  • Pioglitazone and Metformin XR
    Pioglitazone and metformin XR is a combination drug often used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource provides a detailed overview of this medication, with information on how it works, possible side effects, and more.
  • Pioglitazone and Metformin XR Dosage
    A person's pioglitazone and metformin XR dosage will be based on several things, which this eMedTV article describes. The segment also lists the usual amounts when starting treatment with this diabetes drug and includes helpful dosing tips.
  • Pioglitazone and Metformin XR Information
    This selection from the eMedTV archives provides some important information on pioglitazone and metformin XR, which is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. It also includes what to tell the healthcare provider prescribing the drug.
  • PrandiMet
    PrandiMet is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This selection from the eMedTV Web library features an overview of PrandiMet, including information on how it works, possible side effects, and tips on when and how to take the drug.
  • PrandiMet Alternatives
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site features an in-depth look at some of the possible alternatives to PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin). This page also explains when it may be time to consider one of these PrandiMet alternatives.
  • PrandiMet and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV article explains, one of the components in PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin) does pass through breast milk and could cause problems in a breastfed infant. This page further discusses the research on PrandiMet and breastfeeding.
  • PrandiMet and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explores studies on PrandiMet (repaglinide and metformin) and pregnancy, explaining why the FDA classifies it as a pregnancy Category C medicine. This page also explains what to do if you are taking PrandiMet and pregnancy occurs.
  • PrandiMet Dosage
    This page from the eMedTV Web site explains that a doctor will consider several factors before recommending a PrandiMet dosage. This page discusses these factors that may affect your dosage, and provides some general PrandiMet dosing guidelines.
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