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Information on Diabetes - Januvia and Blood Sugar

This page contains links to eMedTV Diabetes Articles containing information on subjects from Information on Diabetes to Januvia and Blood Sugar. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Information on Diabetes
    As this eMedTV article explains, diabetes is a condition that occurs when the body does not make insulin or does not use it properly. This resource gives a brief overview of diabetes, with information on symptoms, who it affects, and more.
  • Information on Diabetic Retinopathy
    This part of the eMedTV site talks about diabetic retinopathy, a leading cause of blindness. This article explains what diabetic retinopathy is and provides some basic information on symptoms, treatment, and more.
  • Information on Type 2 Diabetes
    Type 2 diabetes can cause symptoms such as frequent urination. This eMedTV resource offers more information on type 2 diabetes, including a basic explanation of how it is treated. A link to more details is also included.
  • Injecting Insulin at a Restaurant
    There may come a point where you have no choice but to inject insulin at a restaurant. How to do it? This eMedTV article tells you what you need to know, with tips on being discreet, doing it safely, and more.
  • Inseln
    This eMedTV page explains that insulin is used to treat diabetes. This article also lists some common side effects of insulin and provides general dosing guidelines. A link to more information is also included. Inseln is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Inside the Eye (Cataract Presentation)
    This interactive video describes the parts of the eye involved with sight.
  • Insilin
    Insulin is a type of hormone that helps control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of insulin, including information on how it works and possible side effects. Insilin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Inslin
    As this eMedTV page explains, insulin may be needed to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This page discusses various types of insulins and describes the factors that may affect your dosage. Inslin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insolin
    This eMedTV segment provides an overview of insulin, a medication used to treat diabetes. This article discusses how insulin works and explains what to do if you believe you have taken too much insulin. Insolin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insulan
    This page of the eMedTV site explains how various types of insulin work to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This page also offers some general precautions to be aware of when using insulin. Insulan is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insulen
    A doctor may recommend insulin to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV Web resource describes some of the various types of insulin and discusses some general precautions. Insulen is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insulin
    Insulin is a hormone that can help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV page offers an overview of this hormone and medication, including a description of various types, information on how it works, and possible side effects.
  • Insulin and Breastfeeding
    Insulin is generally considered safe for women who are breastfeeding and their infants. This eMedTV resource takes a look at insulin and breastfeeding, including information on why it probably doesn't matter if insulin passes through breast milk.
  • Insulin and Pregnancy
    The safety of using insulin during pregnancy will depend on which form of insulin you are using. This eMedTV article contains more information about this topic, and explains the importance of controlling your blood sugar during pregnancy.
  • Insulin and Weight Gain
    Weight gain is a possible side effect that may occur with the use of insulin. This page from the eMedTV Web library provides more detailed information on insulin and weight gain, and explains what your doctor may recommend if weight gain occurs.
  • Insulin Aspart Protamine/Insulin Aspart
    Insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart is a type of insulin used for treating diabetes. This page from the eMedTV library describes the effects of this medicine, explains how it works, and offers general dosing information for the medication.
  • Insulin Aspart Protamine/Insulin Aspart Dosage
    No standard insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart dosage will work for the same person in all situations. This eMedTV article offers important insulin aspart protamine/insulin aspart dosing information and includes tips for injecting the drug.
  • Insulin Dosage
    To help determine your insulin dosage, your doctor may recommend carbohydrate counting. This eMedTV page covers dosing guidelines in more detail, including information on how to determine an appropriate dosage and tips on taking this medicine.
  • Insulin Drug Information
    If you have diabetes, you may need to take insulin to keep your blood sugar under control. This eMedTV page offers more information on insulin, including how it works for diabetes and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using this drug.
  • Insulin Drug Interactions
    Beta blockers, MAOIs, and sulfa drugs can cause insulin drug interactions. As this eMedTV article explains, drug interactions with this medication may lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels, which could cause life-threatening problems very quickly.
  • Insulin Overdose
    An insulin overdose may lead to dangerously low blood sugar levels (which can be lethal). This article from the eMedTV Web library explains how to identify possible symptoms of an overdose and describes how this type of overdose may be treated.
  • Insulin Pump
    An insulin pump is a small device used to deliver insulin to the body in people with diabetes. This eMedTV resource explains how the device works, explores the benefits and disadvantages of it, and lists side effects that may occur.
  • Insulin Pump Advantages
    Insulin pumps are a good option because they eliminate the need for individual insulin injections. This eMedTV article provides a list of other possible insulin pump advantages and also explains why this device may not be right for everyone.
  • Insulin Pump Disadvantages
    Insulin pumps are not necessarily ideal for every person or for every situation. This article from the eMedTV archives covers some of the insulin pump disadvantages, but also briefly explores the benefits of this device.
  • Insulin Pump Side Effects
    Potential insulin pump side effects include hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and infections at the needle site. This eMedTV segment lists other possible side effects seen with these devices, including serious ones that require prompt medical attention.
  • Insulin Pump Uses
    An insulin pump is a device used for controlling blood sugar in people with diabetes. This eMedTV Web page covers insulin pump uses in more detail, explains how the device works, and discusses the use of this product in children.
  • Insulin Pump Warnings and Precautions
    If you are hard of hearing, let your doctor know before using an insulin pump. Warnings and precautions, as this eMedTV segment explains, should also be discussed with your doctor beforehand, as the device can be confusing to use at first.
  • Insulin Side Effects
    Skin reactions at the injection site and low blood sugar levels are potential insulin side effects. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible side effects, including a list of warning signs for potentially serious problems.
  • Insulin Storage
    Make sure to check the information packet on your particular insulin product for storage guidelines. This eMedTV page lists several insulin storage tips that generally apply to most insulins; however, the guidelines will vary depending on the insulin.
  • Insulin Uses
    Insulin is used for controlling blood sugar levels in adults and children who have diabetes. This eMedTV Web segment further describes the uses of this medication, including how this hormone works and possible off-label uses.
  • Insulin Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use insulin if you have manual dexterity problems, or liver or kidney disease. This eMedTV page discusses other important insulin warnings and precautions, including what to tell your healthcare provider before starting the drug.
  • Insuline
    This eMedTV page features a brief overview of insulin, a medication used to control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This page also explains when people may need to take more than one insulin. Insuline is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insullin
    A doctor may recommend insulin to help control blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. This eMedTV Web resource explores some side effects of insulin and offers some general dosing information. Insullin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Insuln
    Insulin is a type of hormone and may be needed in the form of a medication for people with diabetes. This eMedTV page discusses insulin, including detail on how the various types of insulin medications work. Insuln is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Invocana
    Invokana is a prescription drug approved to help treat adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explores Invokana in more detail and offers general precautions for using the drug. Invocana is a common misspelling of Invokana.
  • Invokana
    Invokana is taken once daily to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV segment discusses how this medicine works, lists potential side effects, covers dosing tips, and examines various other topics.
  • Invokana 100 Mg Tablet
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the recommended starting dosage for Invokana is a 100-mg tablet taken once daily in the morning before your first meal. This page provides some basic info on Invokana and includes a link to learn more.
  • Invokana 300 Mg
    Your healthcare provider may recommend Invokana 300 mg once daily to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource examines some of the factors that may affect your dosage and outlines some helpful tips for when and how to take this drug.
  • Invokana Alternatives
    A number of alternatives to Invokana (canagliflozin) are available. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists these options, including details on how other medications and lifestyle changes work to treat type 2 diabetes.
  • Invokana and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV resource explains, the manufacturer of Invokana (canagliflozin) advises it not be used in breastfeeding women. This article discusses whether this drug passes through breast milk and stresses the importance of consulting your doctor.
  • Invokana and Other Diabetes Meds
    Taking Invokana with other diabetes meds may cause your blood sugar levels to become too low. This eMedTV page examines some of the diabetes medications that may cause problems when taken with Invokana. It also links to other possible drug interactions.
  • Invokana and Pregnancy
    Is it okay to take Invokana (canagliflozin) during pregnancy? This article from the eMedTV library describes what happened during studies of pregnant animals and explains how Invokana is classified by the Food and Drug Administration.
  • Invokana and Weight Loss
    There are many possible side effects of Invokana, and weight loss is one of them. This eMedTV Web page describes how much weight people lost during Invokana clinical trials. This page also offers a link to other possible side effects.
  • Invokana Diabetes Medication
    Invokana is a medicine prescribed to help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page examines Invokana, including information on how this diabetes medication is taken, safety issues, and its effects on the body.
  • Invokana Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses the factors that your doctor will consider to determine an appropriate Invokana dosage. This article discusses recommended starting amounts, when and how to take the drug, and other helpful dosing tips.
  • Invokana Dosing
    Available as 100-mg and 300-mg tablets, Invokana is taken once daily to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV resource explores Invokana dosing guidelines, including recommended starting amounts and when your dose is taken. It also links to more dosing tips.
  • Invokana Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed list of drugs that can potentially interact with Invokana, such as digoxin, blood pressure medications, and diuretics. This page also provides an explanation of the complications that may occur as a result.
  • Invokana Mechanism of Action
    Wondering how Invokana works? This eMedTV resource describes the drug's mechanism of action within the body. It also covers basic dosing guidelines and includes links to more details.
  • Invokana Medication
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your healthcare provider may prescribe a medication called Invokana. This eMedTV gives a brief overview of this drug, including dosing guidelines and possible side effects.
  • Invokana Overdose
    This eMedTV article explains that dehydration, low blood pressure, and other problems may occur if you overdose on Invokana (canagliflozin). Other effects are described, as are possible treatment options.
  • Invokana Side Affects
    As explained in this eMedTV page, common side effects of Invokana include bladder infections and increased urination. This page gives a brief overview of the drug's side effects. Invokana side affects is a common misspelling of Invokana side effects.
  • Invokana Side Effects
    Yeast infections, bladder infections, and dizziness are some of the possible side effects of Invokana. This eMedTV segment contains more specific details on possible reactions, including problems that may be dangerous and require medical care.
  • Invokana Uses
    Invokana is a drug prescribed to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page examines how this medication works, whether it is safe for use in children, and whether there are any off-label Invokana uses.
  • Invokana Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page discusses several precautions and warnings for the diabetes drug Invokana. This includes potentially serious complications that may occur in some people, as well as issues to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment.
  • Invokanna
    This eMedTV Web selection discusses how the prescription drug Invokana may be beneficial for treating type 2 diabetes in adults. This page also covers dosing and potential side effects. Invokanna is a common misspelling of Invokana.
  • Inzulin
    This page from the eMedTV Web library explains how insulin works to control blood sugar levels in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This Web article also describes the importance of insulin in the body. Inzulin is a common misspelling of insulin.
  • Irbesartan
    Irbesartan is a prescription drug used for the treatment of high blood pressure and diabetic nephropathy. This eMedTV article offers an in-depth look at the drug and its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects.
  • Irbesartan Dosing
    Irbesartan dosing suggestions when treating high blood pressure usually start at 150 mg a day. This eMedTV article provides tips for taking the medication and also offers dosing recommendations for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.
  • Irbesartan Information
    Adults with high blood pressure may benefit from taking irbesartan, a prescription medication. This eMedTV Web article gives an overview of irbesartan, with information on potential side effects and how to take it.
  • Irbesartan Side Effects
    This eMedTV resource offers a list of common irbesartan side effects that may occur, such as fatigue, diarrhea, and heartburn. Side effects that should be reported to your doctor, as well as rare but possible reactions, are also provided.
  • Is Drinking Alcohol Okay With Diabetes?
    Although it is okay for many people with diabetes to drink alcohol, this should be done with caution. This eMedTV resource explains why, lists the dangers alcohol can pose to a person's health, and describes precautions to take if you do decide to drink.
  • Is Fenugreek Safe?
    Although fenugreek is a common herbal supplement, many people still wonder if fenugreek is safe. This eMedTV resource discusses the safety of fenugreek and offers important precautions and warnings to be aware of before taking the supplement.
  • Is Goji Safe?
    Although goji supplements are commonly used, many people may still wonder if goji is safe. This eMedTV article offers general warnings and precautions on taking goji safely and explains what complications may occur with the use of this product.
  • Is Invokana Dangerous?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, Invokana can cause problems like dehydration and decreased kidney function in certain people, and some people need to avoid it altogether. This article takes a quick look at the potential dangers of Invokana.
  • Is Metanx an FDA Approved Drug?
    Because Metanx is a medical food, it is not an FDA-approved drug. This article on the eMedTV site further explains why Metanx does not require FDA approval even though it is only available by prescription. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Is Milk Thistle Safe?
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, some of the milk thistle safety concerns include its potential to make some conditions worse. This page covers other important milk thistle safety warnings and precautions, including who should not use the product.
  • Is There a Cure for Diabetes?
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is a cure of sorts for type 1 diabetes, but people still need to take medication for the rest of their lives. This article also discusses how people with type 2 diabetes can successfully manage this condition.
  • Is There an Inhaled Version of Insulin?
    An inhaled version of insulin used to be available, but has since been removed from the market. This eMedTV segment explains in detail the reasons why this occurred and offers assurance for those who are reluctant to use needles.
  • Janavia
    Januvia is a prescription drug approved for treating type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article describes how Januvia works and explains what you should talk to your doctor about before starting this medication. Janavia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Janeva
    Januvia is a medication often prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page offers a more in-depth look at Januvia and its effects, dosing information, and potential side effects. Janeva is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Janovia
    If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor may prescribe Januvia to help lower your blood sugar. This eMedTV page describes the effects of Januvia and explains what else you can do to lower blood sugar levels. Janovia is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Janumet XR
    Janumet XR tablets are taken once daily to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV segment discusses how this medicine works, lists potential side effects, covers dosing tips, and examines various other topics.
  • Janumet XR Alternatives
    A number of alternatives to Janumet XR (sitagliptin and metformin extended-release) are available. This eMedTV Web page lists these options and describes how some of these other medications work to treat type 2 diabetes.
  • Janumet XR and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV resource explains, the manufacturer of Janumet XR (sitagliptin and metformin extended-release) advises it to be used with caution in breastfeeding women. This article also explores whether this drug passes through breast milk.
  • Janumet XR and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page examines whether it's safe to use Janumet XR (sitagliptin and metformin extended-release) during pregnancy, exploring the research that has been done on this topic. It discusses whether a doctor will recommend this drug in pregnant women.
  • Janumet XR Dosage
    This eMedTV resource discusses the factors that your doctor will consider to determine an appropriate Janumet XR dosage. This article discusses how certain factors may lower your initial amount and outlines some helpful tips on how to best take this drug.
  • Janumet XR Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article provides a detailed list of potential Janumet XR drug interactions, including a list of numerous products that may cause problems with this diabetes drug and an explanation of the complications that may occur as a result.
  • Janumet XR Medication Information
    As a combination medication, Janumet XR can help control blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page provides a brief look at this drug, including information on how it is taken, safety issues, and its effects on the body.
  • Janumet XR Overdose
    This eMedTV article explains that confusion, breathing problems, and even death may occur if you overdose on Janumet XR (sitagliptin and metformin extended-release). Other effects are described, as well as available treatment options.
  • Janumet XR Side Effects
    Common cold symptoms and vomiting are some of the possible side effects of Janumet XR. This eMedTV segment contains more specific details on other reactions with this drug, including problems that are potentially dangerous and require medical care.
  • Janumet XR Uses
    Janumet XR is a combination drug prescribed to lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV Web page examines how this medication works, whether it is safe for use in older adults, and whether there are any off-label uses.
  • Janumet XR Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page discusses several Janumet XR precautions and warnings to talk to your healthcare provider about before starting treatment. This includes potentially serious complications that may occur and who should not take this drug.
  • Januvea
    This eMedTV segment explains that Januvia can be prescribed as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Januvia works by lowering blood sugar levels and comes in three strengths. Januvea is a common misspelling of Januvia.
  • Januvia
    Januvia is a prescription medicine that can help control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV article explains how Januvia works, identifies some potential side effects of the drug, and lists tips on how to take the medicine.
  • Januvia 100 mg Tablets
    The highest strength of Januvia tablets is 100 mg. As this eMedTV article explains, many adults with type 2 diabetes take this amount every day to keep their blood sugar under control. This resource talks more about when and how to take your dosage.
  • Januvia 25 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV article explains, Januvia tablets come in strengths as low as 25 mg. This article highlights some of the dosing guidelines to be aware of before taking this diabetes medicine and provides a link to more details on the topic.
  • Januvia 50 mg
    As explained in this selection from the eMedTV archives, Januvia comes in three strengths -- 25, 50, and 100 mg. This article tells you what you need to know about Januvia dosing, explaining some of the factors that affect your dose.
  • Januvia Alternatives
    DiaBeta, Amaryl, and Glucophage are a few examples of drugs that may be used as alternatives to Januvia. This eMedTV Web page describes some Januvia alternatives, including certain lifestyle changes and insulin and other injectable drugs.
  • Januvia and Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV page explains, low and high blood sugar levels are possible effects of Januvia. Blood sugar levels that are too high or low can cause serious or life-threatening complications. This page also lists symptoms of high and low blood sugar.
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